Ethics Assignment – LA 5

 

Ethical Considerations for Research – Draft #1

Mikayla Taus

Laurentian University

Cambrian College Site

BSN 4416: Nursing Research III

Laura Killam

October 16th, 2018

Ethical Considerations for Research

           Human ethics committees are often used to review studies to identify any risks to the participants and to ensure their protection (Guillemin, Gillam, Rosenthal & Bolitho, 2012). The first ethical consideration is respect for persons, which involves respecting the autonomy of all participants (Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, & Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2014, p.6).  For this to occur, the researcher must allow the participants to make personal decisions freely, such as withdrawing from the study at any time, as well as obtaining informed consent (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.7). The researcher must inform all participants on the studies purpose, what it encompasses, as well as the potential benefits and risks that have been foreseen before informed consent can be provided (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.7). When the participants of a study are incapable of exercising their autonomy, for example in children, the researcher must take further precautions to ensure their interests and wishes are respected. To achieve this respect, the researcher must seek consent through an authorized individual or guardian who is able to make decisions on behalf of the child (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.7).

The second ethical consideration is the concern for welfare, which looks at the individual’s overall health, as well as their economic, physical and social circumstances (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.7). The participant’s personal information and privacy are also contributing factors to their welfare (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.7).  The researcher must provide an adequate amount of information regarding the study, along with addressing any questions that the participants may pose in regard to the studies process, risks and benefits (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8).

The third and final consideration is maintaining justice for the participants in the study (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8). This consideration refers to treating all participants with equal respect and interest, in addition to equally distributing the burdens and benefits of the study. This can be defined as treating the participants fairly and equitably (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8). Within a study, there may be participants who are more vulnerable than others. These participants often have; limited access to opportunities, power and rights or those who have a limited capability to make decisions (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8). It is important for the researcher to identify these participants and give special attention to ensure they are rightfully treated as well (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8).

To assure these ethical considerations are met in this proposal, the researcher will provide adequate details of the study, making sure the participants understand fully before providing informed consent. If the participants have any questions or concerns regarding the details of the study, the researcher will address them. As this study focuses on the research of children, the researcher will ensure to communicate this information through authorized guardians for all participants. In this proposal, the researcher will also keep all personal details of the participants confidential and maintain anonymity. The researcher will treat all participants equally ensuring no child receives more of the burden or benefits from the study. As children are considered as part of the vulnerable population, the researcher will provide extra attention to ensure they are rightfully treated (Canadian Institutes of Health Research et al., 2014, p.8). After the ethics committee has provided approval for the research proposal and the study is completed, all participants will be provided with a copy of the article.

References

Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of   Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. (December 2014). Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans. Retrieved from http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca/pdf/eng/tcps2-        2014/TCPS_2_FINAL_Web.pdf

Guillemin, M., Gillam, L., Rosenthal, D., & Bolitho, A. (2012). Human research ethics committees: examining their roles and practices. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.7(3), 38-49.

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